GIVEN CURRENT PUBLIC CONCERNS AND LOCAL POLICIES IN EFFECT DUE TO THE RECENT PANDEMIC, ALL OF DOUG'S PERFORMANCES HAVE BEEN CANCELLED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.

PLEASE STAY TUNED FOR MORE NEW AND INFO REGARDING DOUG'S 2020 APPEARANCES.

2020 Q & A with Doug

Does Doug play any instruments and/or have any particular favorites?
DB:  "I began playing the piano by ear at the age of about 12, just came naturally to me. I began playing snippets of things I'd hear on the radio and around the house. My parents invested in lessons for me the following year which focused mostly on the old hayride songs. I knew a lot of those tunes pretty well in my head already. So I'd hear my teacher play them and then I'd just copy him. He couldn't get me to actually read music. I ultimately switched to a more patient but strict teacher who lived across town from our home in New England. I eventually gave in and learned to read music, something I'm grateful for to this day. Those lessons lasted only a couple of years and I then became mostly self-taught. Other than the keys, I have wanted to play the drums and bass since my mid-thirties but I really don't have enough innate talent for playing them. Piano remains my instrument of choice.

My current piano is a Kawai digital baby grand which I bought years ago while living in Nashville. While I do play a song or two during public performances here and there, most of my piano playing is limited to dinner guests at my home.

was urged out from behind the piano to be a 'front man' sometime in the late '90s. Although it frightened me beyond words the first few times, I was eventually hooked on the idea of actually "entertaining," where I could engage and interact more with my audience. I think it has paid off. 

At his shows, Doug often talks about how he came up in a very musical family. Did they all sing together as children?
DB: "Pretty much. When my older siblings were growing up, my dad, George, would get out the guitar after supper and play all the old country classics by Tammy Wynette, Ernest Tubb, Loretta Lynn, George Jones and the like. At first my sisters would sing along while clearing the table and doing the dishes. Later, this shared experience spilled over to the rest of us kids (10 in all.)

Growing up, we sang together as a family at area civic events and senior gatherings. It wasn't long before many of the older kids learned guitar, drums and other instruments and later formed smaller configurations of their own or performed solo. There's not one of us in the bunch that is tone-deaf. What are the odds, huh? Needless to say, my folks are quite happy that the music gene trickled down pretty well. Their kids all have a musical talent of some kind. We were a bit like the Osmond family. Making music was something we always agreed on doing together."

How can I book the Doug Breau Show?

Go to the Contact page, submit your best contact information, including what type of entertainment you are looking for at your event and we will be in touch!

Look for more 2020 Q&A in the next few months!

 

This month's song pick! 

"The Wayward Wind" 
Written by Stanley Lebowsky & Herb Newman

Recorded by artists as diverse as Patsy Cline and Neil Young, it was the signature tune for Gogi Grant, released in 1956.

Grant was born Myrtle Audrey Arinsberg in 1924 (Philadelphia) and passed away in 2016 (Los Angeles.) She was signed to Era records in 1955. Most of her recordings stem from that year through 1969, though she continued performing for several decades. Her first release, "Suddenly There's A Valley" (1955) was a moderate hit but it was the following year she topped the charts with Wayward. Unfortunately, she never achieved the same chart status again.

Collectively, songwriters Lebowsky & Newman composed such hits as "Fosse," "And Her Name Is Scarlett," "The Birds And The Bees" and "Take Off With Us," 

 

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